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20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
crystal said this weekend does not hurt the economy. bill clinton did it. we had six of the best years we've had in the last 60. >> it sounds like there's a bit of a yawn, a gap, between what crystal said on sunday and what rich trunka appeared to say or wanted to say yesterday outside of the white house. is it clear to you that labor and the left and moveon are being more rigid than some of the leading conservative thinkers? >> sure. and that's up to the president to manage that. if he gets the increase in rates or something very close to what he's asking for and gets substantial elimination of corporate loopholes and some individuals like romney plan, then we've got to go back to our base and say, yes, we've got to cut entitlements too because it's got to be part of a deal that has spending cuts at a significant level above the 1 trillion we've already done and revenue. look, unless we do 4 trillion to 5 trillion, we're not doing anything in my judgment that's particularly meaningful. >> walk me through the optics of what we'll see today. grover norquist last night said he thought ceos
since the '30s. >> we were tying it all the way remember with bill clinton, becky, bill clinton realizes no matter what happens the next four years will be good, housing recovers, so if he doesn't make sure the president's reelected then hillary can't run in 2016 because romney would be an eight-year president. whoever is there is going to get credit for it. steve, are we guaranteed the next four years as housing recovers no matter what policies we pursue it's going to be 3% or 4% growth? >> sadly no. in 2008 before we had the financial panic in september and depressed housing markets like phoenix, las vegas and a couple other areas we started to see signs of life again so if you get government out of the way, housing would recover far more quickly and let the markets clear, recover far more quickly. the key thing you got to have stable money, don't pile on new taxes and don't pile on all of the new regulations that are coming. those are crushers. >> i want to know whether reinhardt-rogoff was right. if we stay slow for four years it was more than the financial crisis, that washington po
clinton. up next, mike allen with the top stories in the "politico playbook." first bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good morning, mika. a lot of people off from school and work today. but if you're heading out, you need the umbrella in many states. it's just rain and falling temperatures. who's at risk and who needs the umbrella. detroit, your rain has begun. you'll have about four hours of it. same for cleveland and columbus eventu eventually. lexington, louisville, cincinnati, you're included. this cold front is pushing all the way down through the deep south with showers and storms now from nashville to tuscaloosa. eventually birmingham and montgomery. so the forecast also is going to include falling temperatures. we're very warm on the eastern half of the country, east of the mississippi. but look at the midwest. we are cold in minneapolis, denver, billings, kansas city, st. louis and even dallas and chicago are chilly this morning. that cold air is going to plunge to the east as we go throughout the day. so your monday forecast, one more nice, beautiful day fro
, former chief of staff for bill clinton bowles on closing bell yesterday talking about the long-term consequences of the fiscal cliff. >> if we do get our house in order, the future of america is bright and can compete with the best and brightest wherever they are. if we don't, we're on our way to becoming a second-rate power. >> joined by illinois congressman peter ross couple. he sits on the ways and means committee and joins us with john harwood and myself at the white house. congressman, good morning. >> hey, good morning, great to be with you. >> we already have the president wishing the speaker a happy birthday. i guess baby steps. right? how do you think the tone is shaping up today? >> i think the tone is good. look. president obama won on tuesday last. the speaker of the house congratulated him and lid out a pathway for the president to lead the nation on how to avoid the fiscal cliff and transform us in to the world class status we want to stay and maintain. so far i think the language is good. there's opportunities i think to find common ground. there's no voices on t
, but the republicans have substantial power because of the rules of the senate. the democratic president. as bill clinton would say, it's arithmetic. nothing is going to get done unless we find a way to work together. and i'll tell you, the public has just had it. well, you know, the approval rating of congress is in single digits. it's pretty awful. and it's all about, in my view, the inability to simply sit down and solve some of these problems. >> senator, quick question, brian sullivan from cnbc here. would you support a fiscal cliff resolution on taxes that did not involve an elevation of the top-end rate? in other words, 35 to 39.6, would you support a tax increase but only as boehner would like to do through the reductions or deductions, or are you fixed to that rate? >> well, i think we're fixed too much on this issue because it's only a small piece. even if you do the increase on the people above $250,000, it's a long way from solving the full problem. i'm a simpson-bowles guy myself in the sense that i think there's got to be an across-the-board settlement. so i think what you're really
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)